Diabetes and Smoking – Never a Good Mix

November is Diabetes Awareness month and a fitting time to speak of the harmful consequences of smoking cigarettes with diabetes. Awareness is also needed regarding the associated link between smoking and type 2 diabetes.

 

Diabetes is a group of diseases which are on the rise, including more than 29 million Americans and 380 million people worldwide. The most familiar types of diabetes are: type 1 -- formerly known as juvenile-onset or insulin dependent diabetes, and the more common type 2 -- formerly called adult-onset or non insulin-dependent diabetes. People who have diabetes have blood sugar levels that are abnormally high because their body doesn't make enough insulin to process the sugar, or can't use it properly.

 

Over time, diabetes can be wearing on the body and is associated with serious health complications. Presently diabetes cannot be cured, but it can be managed, and complications reduced. Quitting smoking is especially important in not only the management and reduction of health complications for those with diabetes, but also in reducing a person's risk of getting the disease.       

                         

                           The Negative Impact of Smoking with Diabetes 

  • Smokers with diabetes tend to have more difficulty with insulin dosing and poorer control over blood sugar levels than non smokers, making management of their disease more difficult.
  • Those with diabetes are 2 to 4 times more likely to get heart disease, and the chances of having a stroke are doubled. Smoking worsens and speeds up the growth of plaque build up on the walls of the arteries, causing narrowing and reducing the oxygen and blood supply to the affected areas in the body. Smoking also raises bad cholesterol levels and blood pressure. It's plain to see how smoking with diabetes multiplies the risk for heart disease and stroke.  
  • Diabetes presents a risk for developing long-term complications affecting the eyes (diabetic retinopathy), kidneys (diabetic nephropathy), and nerves (diabetic neuropathy). Smoking will aggravate these conditions and could lead to more serious symptoms and require much more treatment.

 

                              Smoking Increases the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes 

If you are still smoking, here’s another great reason to quit. A smoker’s odds of developing diabetes are 30 to 40 % higher than a nonsmoker's. The longer you smoke, the higher your risk. Smoking raises blood sugar levels. The nicotine and other chemicals in smoke can impair your body's response to insulin and lead to insulin resistance, a precursor for the disease. To prevent diabetes it's necessary to quit smoking, stay physically active, and lose weight if you are overweight or obese.

 

                            The Benefits of Quitting Smoking Now

  • Better management of blood sugar levels.
  • Improvements in insulin sensitivity.
  • Reduces the risk of heart disease and stroke, which are already a risk factor for those with diabetes. 
  • Reduces aggravating diabetic complications involving the eyes, kidneys, nerves and vascular system.
  • Decreases the chances of premature death.

 

Diabetes and smoking is a harmful mix. If you smoke, it’s especially important that you stop now to prevent serious health complications. There’s no need to quit alone; you can always find online non-smoking support, or find ex-smokers in your family or circle of friends.  If you don’t smoke, continue to keep up the good work and stay that way. Quitting smoking now will benefit your health immediately, whether you have diabetes or not. It's the best thing you can do for your wellbeing!

 

Keep Going and Keep the Quit!

 

BetteQ

Q Counselor