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3 Rules For Surviving Arguments Without Tobacco

  
  
  

anger

For many of us, the first reaction to any conflict was a cigarette or a dip. Tobacco seemed to level us off, cool us down, help us focus during or after an upsetting situation. We shouldn't be surprised if we find ourselves getting angry more often, or getting more angry often, after we quit tobacco. Some of us seemed to be in all kinds of disagreements for awhile after quitting, and have even been asked by significant others to please start smoking again!

We didn't quit smoking just to be angry and miserable, did we? And we certainly don't want emotional firestorms to jeopardize our quits. The good news is that we can manage confrontations without alienating everyone around us, or by turning to the numbing distraction of nicotine. We do this by managing ourselves in tense situations, following these three simple rules:

Rule #1: Remove Yourself From The Conflict (or, It's Ok To Walk Away)

You don't have to go to every fight you're invited to. Trying to resolve conflicts while emotionally super-charged is counter-productive; it's too easy to misread and escalate. Remind yourself that your quit is your #1 priority, and that arguments can be a relapse trigger. You don't have to exit gracefully, just get out of the argument by any means possible. Tell the other person that you're too fired up to continue right now, that it would be a good idea to take a break. Then leave the room, hang up the phone or log out, take a walk. The problem won't just go away, but you won't have worsened it by adding tobacco to the mix.

Rule #2: Get a Handle on Your Emotions (or, Don't Try to Control What You Can't)

Nobody and nothing has the power to make you smoke against your will, so take responsibility for your own feelings and choices. Deep breathing is a stress reliever (we used to do it when smoking, with smoke), so start by regaining control of your breath. Have a seat, and take five to ten deep breaths. Breathe in as much air as you can hold, count to five, and then push your breath out through tightly-pursed lips. If you use any kind of prayer or meditation tools, or affirmations like, Easy Does It, now is a good time to employ them.

 When you're reasonably settled, log in or call a quit-buddy or trusted confidant and run the situation by them. Listen to yourself as you recount the story; we often tell ourselves exactly what we need to hear when we open ourselves up a little to someone else. The humor with which others respond to our crises is often a great anger deactivator. Our friends' similar experiences, or objective observations, can enlighten us, too.

Rule #3: Clean Your Side Of The Street (or, Do You Want To Be Right Or Be Happy?)

Sooner or later, you'll  have to re-engage with the person or situation you were fighting. Nothing frees us more, or resolves conflicts more effectively, than first getting clear on our own part in them. Think over the beginning, middle, and end of the situation, asking yourself:

"Is any of this mine to own? What is my role in it? Is this really an issue important to me, or am I just blowing off steam? Is my anger appropriate to the situation?" We often use anger to cover our own culpability, no matter how small, or to re-direct the anger we feel over someone or something else. Sometimes we're just mad because we can't smoke!

Looking ahead toward a solution to the conflict, consider:

"What is the result I desire most here? Am I trying to punish, or just to be heard? Am I trying to control or change someone else's thinking or behavior? Is there any of my behavior or thinking that needs to change?"

Writing about your thoughts in a journal can help you calm down and see more clearly.

Finally, the most important questions of all:

"What is the best course of action to achieve my desired result? What's my next move, or 'next right thing' that needs to be done here? Do I owe an apology? Do I want to be right, or be happy?"

When you feel ready to move on, stand up and do a nice hard stretch, letting the internal tension release itself. You've done some important work, without an iota of nicotine in the mix.

There's no easy fix for post-quit anger. It just slowly dissipates. We develop new behavioral responses to life the same way we formed the old ones -- one day at a time, one situation at a time. And the best we know how to do is always a little ahead of the best we're able to do, so don't be too critical of your progress.  Practice makes perfect, but it's progress, not perfection, that we should seek.

Alan Peters, CTTS-M

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Comments

A really wise and thorough analysis. Though I did not experience problems controlling anger or staying out of arguments after I quit, I can recognize really well thought out advice. I did suffer some irritability, but thankfully it lasted only a short time and in brief episodes. Thank you!
Posted @ Friday, November 15, 2013 6:23 PM by Bob Martin
This is my third time trying to quit and I have to admit that through my experiences this is great advice :)
Posted @ Friday, November 22, 2013 8:15 AM by David
Very thought provoking.
Posted @ Wednesday, January 01, 2014 7:38 PM by LadyLMI
This is a great article... I'm going to stop smoking by January 31st 2014.
Posted @ Tuesday, January 21, 2014 7:46 PM by Vernetta
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